The Movie JR Shot!

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With all the fond recollections of the late lamented Larry Hagman’s role as J.R. Ewing in Dallas, I thought I’d chime in.

Except I didn’t watch Dallas.

I could share some vague recollections about I Dream of Jeannie, except that I remember Bill Daily a tad better and , frankly, it’s Barbara Eden that got all my attention.

To me, Larry Hagman will always be remembered as the director of either Son of Blob or Beware! The Blob, depending on which release you caught it under.
Directing is a big word here. The film is largely improvised. Reportedly, there wasn’t much attention paid to the script..or framing…or performances… (N.B.: However, the Cinematographer’s son took time to write me and say this wasn’t the case and that the final film is very close to the script. See comment below.)

In 1982, following the infamous Dallas “cliffhanger”, it was re-released with the genius tagline “THE MOVIE J.R. SHOT!”. I can’t top that which is why I’ve cribbed it for the title of this entry. (My first in over 6 months- I know. I’ve been dealing with a soap of my own.)

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It was acclaimed as genius in France! So consider yourself warned.

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So without further ado, here is the entire feature.

Thanks again , Larry.

Pain Level: 6/10

Quality of Pain: Gelatinous and sticky.

Painjoyment level: High.

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About The Cinémasochist

I'd rather just talk about "bad" movies. View all posts by The Cinémasochist

3 responses to “The Movie JR Shot!

  • Terence

    Well I just wanted to let you know that the movie Larry Hagman made was filmed by my dad Bill Foster, and I own a copy of the original directors script, and so you know, the movie follows the script very closely. There are a few things improvised, including my dads cameo appearance at the end acting as a news reporter. Both he and the sherrif add libed thier lines in the ending.

  • Steven L. Austin

    When I was a would-be teenaged filmmaker I had the pleasure of sharing a Thanksgiving dinner with Chicago native/improv genius Del Close, who regaled me with some very inappropriate tales about the making of this film (in which he had a small role). Most of his stories were drug & booze-related. Apparently more than a few of the cast members barely managed to get through the shoot in heightened states of mind… thanks to his “share & share alike” philosophy. Then he rolled up his sleeves and showed me his numerous needle tracks! “Don’t do drugs, kid,” he admonished with a [straight] face. (I did, however, get into filmmaking.)

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